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Immortals Of Meluha

The Immortals Of Meluha (Paperback)

The Immortals Of Meluha (Paperback)

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2 Stars
41 Ratings
Published by Westland And Tranquebar Press

456 pages

ISBN-10:

9380658540

(

ISBN-13:

9789380658544)

Retail Price:

Rs. 295

Bookchums Price:

Rs. 266

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This once proud empire and its Suryavanshi rulers face severe perils as its primary river, the revered Saraswathi, is slowly drying to extinction. They also face devasting terrorist attacks from the east, the land of the Chandravanshis. To make matters worse, the Chandravanshis appear to have allied with the Nagas, an ostracised and sinister race of deformed humans with astonishing martial skills. The only hope for the Suryavanshis is an ancient legend: When evil reaches epic proportio...

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15 Reviews of The Immortals Of Meluha (Paperback)

To Amish Sir, I heard alot about your books and also want to purchase all of your book (Shiva's Triology) but sir I have found that you have made the first version in Ma.. More details To Amish Sir,

I heard alot about your books and also want to purchase all of your book (Shiva's Triology) but sir I have found that you have made the first
version in Marathi and later on next versions are on gujarathi and english. Sir, I wanted to purchase this books for not only me but but for the family
members also for my grandfather. If you publish these novels into Marathi it will be more easy to us all to understand and feel the book.

Please think about this.

Thanking you in advance,
Shrikant Kale.
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People expecting this to be a shivpuran will be disappointed as this 400 page mythological saga is a hand blended characterization of the most fascinating mythological go.. More details People expecting this to be a shivpuran will be disappointed as this 400 page mythological saga is a hand blended characterization of the most fascinating mythological god of all time and the plot is a fictional tale. But as you turn the pages, it creates sheer brilliance and a magnificent storytelling unfolding every scene which is so beautifully written that there is no point in not admiring it the insights dropped in this to imagine the story and characters, events, places and descriptions. It ultimately leaves you chanting “mahadev- the god of gods”. It’s a near perfect book that will keep you engaged and mesmerized from the start to finish.
What I liked was the retelling of Shiva myth as the god I imagined him to be, the ganja smoking, dreadlocks and dancing in intense flow ,fighting fearsome battles and bringing alive the hindu godhead,one of the trinity. Overall a neat ,clear cut writing which has appealed to a lot of people making Amish a first class storyteller.
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Its a different story More details Its a different story Hide details
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Rated this book

People expecting this to be a shivpuran will be disappointed as this 400 page mythological saga is a hand blended characterization of the most fascinating mythological go.. More details People expecting this to be a shivpuran will be disappointed as this 400 page mythological saga is a hand blended characterization of the most fascinating mythological god of all time and the plot is a fictional tale. But as you turn the pages, it creates sheer brilliance and a magnificent storytelling unfolding every scene which is so beautifully written that there is no point in not admiring it the insights dropped in this to imagine the story and characters, events, places and descriptions. It ultimately leaves you chanting “mahadev- the god of gods”. It’s a near perfect book that will keep you engaged and mesmerized from the start to finish.
What I liked was the retelling of Shiva myth as the god I imagined him to be, the ganja smoking, dreadlocks and dancing in intense flow ,fighting fearsome battles and bringing alive the hindu godhead,one of the trinity. Overall a neat ,clear cut writing which has appealed to a lot of people making Amish a first class storyteller.
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i want to buy the book. how do i buy it withouth the BUY button??? please advice!!! More details i want to buy the book. how do i buy it withouth the BUY button??? please advice!!! Hide details
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I didn't see any link to buy this book. How do I buy?????????????????? More details I didn't see any link to buy this book. How do I buy?????????????????? Hide details
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I should generally have clung onto my resolve never to read conventional best-sellers in India. But no! I had to give into the hype and get sucked into the general euphor.. More details I should generally have clung onto my resolve never to read conventional best-sellers in India. But no! I had to give into the hype and get sucked into the general euphoric whirlpool that surrounds me.
“Immortals of Meluha” was one such book. It’s an accomplishment.
Understatement. Accomplishment would be de-meaning to say the least. It would have been an accomplishment if you’d told me that the author was perhaps, ten years old. Staggering for a ten-year old. But heck, no, it has been penned down by a management grad who’s also a part-time i-banker now. (Part-time, as of now because the books been on the best-seller stands for quite some time and every bookstore promptly/proudly displays the book on its glass-shelved windows! Oh beg pardon, he’s actually QUIT!)
Anyways coming back to the book – the protagonist is Shiva, a stoned Tibetan who loves his marijuana and makes outrageously bad jokes ( that even makes the P in PJ’s cringe)who decides to move his tribe to this paradise called Meluha ( set in Kashmir, welcome to India)and settled down here for good. Life’s good, you got good samples of weed, another addictive elixir called Somras (God’s drinks) which promises longevity and good health (apart from mild discomforts of giving him a blue-throat), princesses and hand-maidens ready to chase around trees. But alas! Good things don’t last forever. He finds himself to be the centre of attention because of his blue-throat (some weird kind of super-power huh!) – He’s actually the deliverer from Evil for this whole kingdom they’ve been waiting for, for centuries.
You’re born into your destiny, you may run, you may hide but you can never escape.
Classic superhero stuff really. You get thrust into unlikely situations, with responsibility you never wanted thrust upon you and finally you come out trumps. Simple plan. And Amish sticks to this doggedly. Siva turns out to be the unlikely hero, gradually winning the hearts over, including that of stubborn sati (love-interest) and the egoistical general (Strong Paternal Father figure).
The plot flows. It never ebbs. Events unfolding one after the other. And it’s admirable how Amish has turned out mythological stories and given them a nice believable touch, weaving in countless folklores and characters from Hindu mythology into his narrative. He brings to life a lot of practices in the Indian culture that leaves a warm after glow.
That’s the good stuff. His narrative is so jarring that I almost stopped in the middle. You don’t realize in the beginning, but as the story unfolds, you expect the jitters to settle down and the author to get to his own, telling an admirable story. But no. Amish writes like he is writing his school literature project (unguided at that!) the language is horrendous. ( blame me of course, I have been spoiled silly by the likes of Steven Erikson and G RR Martin, but I gave the guy enough rope to come up good!)
Set pieces and action scenes are abrupt; X pirouetting with a sword was the best move he came up with. Romantic interludes between Shiva and Sati left me cringing and diving for cover sometime. Sample this:
“Why would I not want to touch Sati? I want to keep touching her in every possible way throughout my life!”
Character development of Siva, was probably another of the saving graces. We see him grow throughout the book, finally accepting his destiny and growing into it. Side characters have been left right there. On the side-walk. Neglected and forlorn. He also weaves in an element of mystery with the help of “Old Pandits” who counsel and advice Siva whenever he’s lost. The “nagas” also was an interesting touch – let us see how he builds up on that promise though. I am not sure, if I will risk another venture into the “happy zone of weed-loving Tibetan stoned Messiah” again though. I have heard Amish tries to go “Literary” in his second book by concentrating on his language rather than story. (Shudders!)
May the Force be with you. Or better said, May the Weeds be with you.
Two out of five. One for the myth. One for effort.
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What the Hell??? More details What the Hell??? Hide details
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After hearing rave reviews from my friends, I decided to get my hands on Amish Tripathi's debut book. The concept of depicting Lord Shiva as a common man and highlighting.. More details After hearing rave reviews from my friends, I decided to get my hands on Amish Tripathi's debut book. The concept of depicting Lord Shiva as a common man and highlighting his rise to godhood because of his karma, was what attracted me to this book. I have not yet read any books or watched any TV serials where Shiva has been depicted as a common man. So this was bound to be an exciting read.

And exciting it was.

Shiva is depicted as a head of the powerful Guna tribe, living in Mount Kailash. But his destiny is beyond the limit of the mountains and he started realizing this when he was invited to migrate, along with his tribe, to the the land of the Meluha - the most perfect civilisation on earth governed by the Suryavanshis, the descendants of Lord Ram. Everything is perfect in this kingdom with the exception of one problem - the consistent attacks from the evil Chandravanshis, aided by the wretched but powerful Nagas.

Thus starts Shiva's search of destiny and it takes him through circumstances and incidents which not only test his martial skills but also his judgement of right vs wrong, his capacity to love, his leadership and his ability to mobilize people for a common cause.

The book has its share of twists and turns that kept me on my toes. It is set back in 1900 B.C. and Amish has taken time to illustrate certain aspects of the society like the caste system, the architecture of the Meluhan Cities, for example, to a great detail giving the book a historical flavour that blends well with the mythological characters and the story line.

The one aspect of the book that I found a bit depriving was the language. Although the book is set way back in history, the language and the expressions used in the book are modern, including the conversation between the characters. This might derail those readers who are looking at a more artistic and historical script as they might find it a bit difficult to reconcile the script and the story line. However, this makes it an easy and fluent read which what will make most general readers read the book. I personally would have preferred Amish using a more formal language for the book, more in lines of historical fiction writers like Conn IgGuilden (the Emperor Series, Chengis Khan, etc) who manages to churn out easily readable page turners still maintaining the rhythm between the story and the language.

Overall, this is an interesting read - one that you would not want to put down until you get to the end. But beware, this is a cliffhanger - the story doesn't finish as there are two more books coming up in the trilogy. But go read this - at least for the concept of the story !

I for sure am looking forward book 2 - The Secret of the Nagas..
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I simply loved this book. The book is set in 1900 BC. It is that time when Meluha still lives by the ideals set by God Rama, who lived many years ago. Meluhans or Suryava.. More details I simply loved this book. The book is set in 1900 BC. It is that time when Meluha still lives by the ideals set by God Rama, who lived many years ago. Meluhans or Suryavanshis are waiting desperately for an ancient legend to come true and save them from the notorious Chandravanshis and Nagas who have been terrorizing and torturing people of Meluha.
A young tribal from Mount Kailash, Shiva is invited to visit the place. The book narrates how Shiva becomes Mahadev, the destroyer of evil (also called Neelkanth in Indian mythology). Myths have maintained that when evil becomes uncontrollable, when all hopes are lost, then appears the saviour, the destroyer of evil. And the same happens in the novel. Immortals of Meluha, is the first in the trilogy, which speaks about how Shiva transforms to become the saviour and was called God.
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MELUHA by ANISH TRIPATHI MELUHA is one of the better Fiction-non-fiction books to have hit stands in a long time. It is an interesting thought of God as Human rising to.. More details MELUHA by ANISH TRIPATHI
MELUHA is one of the better Fiction-non-fiction books to have hit stands in a long time. It is an interesting thought of God as Human rising to its title / status/ belief based on his work. Shiva in the book, is a well built person who is full of doubts, needs to earn respect, hugely emotive, supremely confident and disturbed by some events of past.. It is an engaging plot which keeps you wanting to know more. he not really an on the edge pace or a grand adventure it leaves you at the end on a note waiting for the next. http://sanjeevkotnala.blog.co.in/2011/02/25/meluha/
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Mythology has always been a draw for readers and writers alike. Some adapt and some take the basic skeleton and some just retell the same story. But what we cannot resist.. More details Mythology has always been a draw for readers and writers alike. Some adapt and some take the basic skeleton and some just retell the same story. But what we cannot resist the immense drama and learnings that we always get from our mythology. The Immortals of Meluha is just like that.
This book is the first part of a trilogy. The story is about a warlord leader called Shiva. He leads his group out of their habitat and into Melhua for their safety. He and his tribe come from what is perhaps modern-day Tibet, challenging many preconceived notions of who or what are our origins of Ram and Shiva. Meluha is searching for it next king and as fate would have it, Shiva is fated to be that King. Shiva becomes Neelkanth, who is also considered a reincarnate of Ram and starts familiarizing himself with the problems of this kingdom.
Neelkanth meets Sati, a widowed daughter of the current ruler, and despite opposition, gets married to her. This kingdom, which he will hail from, is called the Suryavanshis. This kingdom faces the perpetual threat of the Chandravanshis who are the other side of this kingdom. As it is a trilogy, book one finishes with a major attack in which an attempt is made on Shiva’s life and he getting a chance to see life the Chandravanshi way.
On a story level, it is a very fast-paced story that leaves you hungering for more. I cannot wait for the next books. It has action, suspense and very fast-paced action sequences. There are so many nods to biological warfare and nuclear weapons and regular combat that you can often forget the story is based in mythology. On a language level, it is very carelessly written. If this book was well crafted in terms of language, the book’s appeal would have been considerable. The language has short forms and linguistic leaps one does not associate with mythology based fiction.
What I liked best about this book is that it examines some interesting concepts, which if implemented in today’s times, would change the fabric of society. This kingdom has an interesting concept where all the children are raised together till a certain age. Then children are sent to homes according to their abilities and capabilities. There is no caste or creed involved. It sounds quite revolutionary. One of the biggest thought I came away with was related to the end of the first part. Shiva notices that though Chandravanshis are considered the enemies, they are also normal people who are suffering because their rulers inflict bad decisions on them. And that certainly does not make them an enemy. One cannot help but draw a parallel on India and Pakistan and how terrorism affects both countries just as much. Whether Amish intended this parallel or not, many readers and friends who have read this book feel this parallel is a very strong statement the book leaves you with.
The next two books are The Secret of the Nagas and The Oath of the Vayuputras.
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i would call it a mythological thriller-fiction. surely a page turner. all the sanskrit phrases/words/terms used ae very well explained. must read. More details i would call it a mythological thriller-fiction. surely a page turner. all the sanskrit phrases/words/terms used ae very well explained. must read. Hide details
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Very good book More details Very good book Hide details
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About Amish Tripathi

Amish Tripathi is a Mumbai-based author. Tripathi's debut work The Immortals of Meluha after being r...

More books by Amish Tripathi