BookChums Cart
You are here : Blog »

Sia

Search : 
Writer, editor, voracious reader, techie, Paritosh Uttam wears many hats. His first novel, Dreams in Prussian Blue was published by Penguin India under its Metro Reads banner in January 2010.     He has also edited Urban Shots, an anthology of 29 short stories.  While his latest offering, Urban Shots hits the shelves this week, we get talking about his first novel, Dreams in Prussian Blue, writing and much more. Read on...      &n...
Post by: Alpana Mallick
Manu Joseph – a renowned name in the field of journalism seeks no introduction. But we shall tell you a tad bit about him anyways. Formerly Features Editor of the The Times of India, Manu Joseph has also written for Conde Nast's wired.com, and the UK Independent.  He was shortlisted for Society magazine's Young Achiever Award and in a website survey among Indian journalists, he was voted 'The Most Stylish Writer'. In 2007, he was a Chevenin...
Post by: BookChums
The Macmillan Dictionary describes the word “controversy” as: a disagreement, especially about a public policy or a moral issue that a lot of people have strong feelings about. Now to think that a book can cause a disagreement about social or moral issues is not all that astounding. Don’t get me wrong, but the multitude of such books has only risen with time. I know we say we don’t need reassurance from anyone regarding our selection of reading...
Post by: Sonia Safri
Some authors write after calculating how commercially successful a subject would be, while some write for the pleasure of expressing and sharing their feelings/observations. For some, writing is as natural an activity as eating or sleeping. And one such contemporary writer is Sweta Srivastava Vikram. Sweta began writing chapbooks titled  Because All Is Not Lost, Kaleidoscope: An Asian Journey of Colors, and Beyond the Scent of Sorrow and has now released her...
Post by: Deepti Khanna
“Surrealism is destructive, but it destroys only what it considers to be shackles limiting our vision.” – Salvador Dali Origin: The 1920s experienced paradoxical times on different parts of the globe. Most importantly, it was a time of angst, creativity, confusion, irrationality, skirmishes, industrialization, and political upheaval. It was the ‘Roaring Twenties’ or the ‘Jazz Age’ for the US and Canada while other parts of ...
Post by: Kabita Sonowal
It is that time of the year again, for the Man Asian Literary Prize 2011 shortlist is out! Seven novels feature in this shortlist for the 2011 edition of the prize, the list is in alphabetical order: AMITAV GHOSH, India River of Smoke (John Murray/Penguin India/Hamish Hamilton) BANANA YOSHIMOTO, Japan The Lake (Melville House) JAHNAVI BARUA, India Rebirth (Penguin India/Penguin Books) JAMIL AHMAD, Pakistan The Wandering Falcon (Penguin Indi...
Post by: BookChums
Interview with Prionka Ray We chatted up with debutant author Prionka Ray who has penned Sia, a novel that tells us about the different hues of the relationship shared by sisters. The book is also a departure from the kind of novels being released these days.  In the conversation, author Prionka Ray talks about being an educator, living in many cities and what kind of writing appeals to her. You have written on your blog that biographies in general are r...
Post by: Deepti Khanna
            Jules Gabriel Verne, popularly known as Jules Verne was born on February 8, 1828. Also referred to as the ‘Father of Science Fiction’, he would have been 186 years old today! Writing in the science-fiction and adventure genres, his writings continue to thrill and captivate the minds of millions with his heightened and fresh imagination. He enhanced the minds of several writers from different genres later. &n...
Post by: Kabita Sonowal
                           Smita Sahay’s writings have been featured on Ripples: Short Stories by Indian Women Writers by APK Publishers, Asia Writes and Muse India. In this exclusive interview with BookChums, she discussed the inspiration behind her short stories titled Black Blood and The Caretaker from the Ripples collection, her favorite writers, earliest writings, suggestions ...
Post by: Kabita Sonowal
  There is something about dying early especially among writers and poets. In an ironical turn, we are not to see them grow old ever. We do not see what they have may ultimately turned out to be. Take for example the English poet John Keats; his passing away at 26 was a tragedy, but also gave us a body of work that was romantic and unaffected by what may have turned into the bitterness of old age.   Dear bookworms, we honour today one of the greatest of th...
Post by: Snehith Kumbla


Latest Posts