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We live in an interesting era. New-age Indian authors are on the rise. The market is flooding with authors churning out English books that revolve around campus fiction, contemporary fiction, murder mysteries, local everyday drama, and the commercial story sorts. They give an almost accurate picture of society as it exists today. The real and sometimes pretentious situations; the fictionally honest thoughts; and the simply elaborate settings gel remarkably to make up for...
Post by: Sonia Safri
Book Launch - Indira Gandhi - The Final Chapter by Suraj 'Eskay' Sriram Friday, April 29, 2011 Pune.   Crossword, at ICC Towers, saw a houseful of audience gathered for the book launch of Suraj 'Eskay' Sriram's latest book of illustrations - Indira Gandhi - The Final Chapter. A book of illustrations, Indira Gandhi - The Last Chapter, lampoons the political figure through witty cartoons. It draws a satirical portrait of the Indian leader while ...
Post by: Sonia Safri
An avid blogger, a stickler when it comes to editing copies, a dreamer who writes on love, life and everything in between and an experimental photographer. That’s Naman Saraiya for you. He loves each of these roles and hopes to reach a stage where he can say it's a perfect balance between all these. Ambitious and a multi-tasker is what we shall like to add to this long list of epithets that best describe him. The stories he contributed for Urban Shots ...
Post by: Deepti Khanna
A "lesser known poet", a brilliant author, and an extremely charming young girl - Ismita Tandon Dhankher made waves with her debut novel- Love On The Rocks earlier this year. BookChums got talking with Ismita and here's all that we found out. We saw your blog and it has some real good poetry. So let’s begin with the clichéd one first – when and how did you start writing poetry? Poetry happened to me at the age of twenty-six when I went...
Post by: Sonia Safri
Some authors write after calculating how commercially successful a subject would be, while some write for the pleasure of expressing and sharing their feelings/observations. For some, writing is as natural an activity as eating or sleeping. And one such contemporary writer is Sweta Srivastava Vikram. Sweta began writing chapbooks titled  Because All Is Not Lost, Kaleidoscope: An Asian Journey of Colors, and Beyond the Scent of Sorrow and has now released her...
Post by: Deepti Khanna
When one refers to Speculative Fiction, it usually dates back to ancient Greece. It is a work of historical invention. As the phrase suggests, dramatists, poets, and authors speculated and usually caught the ire of the audience. Take the instance of Euripides’ Medea. He wrote a dramatic version of Medea where she murdered her own children in a fit of passion and avenged herself. Euripides displeased the Athenian audience with his dramatic tragedy. A lot of previous...
Post by: Kabita Sonowal
      You have got only three lines to say it. You have lesser characters than you have on twitter to write it down. To be precise, you shouldn’t be exceeding more than 17 syllables. The traditional number of syllables for the three lines is in this order respectively – five, seven & five. We talk here about the ancient form of Japanese poetry called Haiku.   The origins go back to 17th century Japan, where the form was then cal...
Post by: Snehith Kumbla
From discussion on varied writing styles, hike in divorce rates and writing about sex, the Pune book launch of Preeti Shenoy’s third book Tea For Two and A Piece of Cake had it all. The blogger and writer, a Bangalore-based writer was in town to promote her third release, Tea For Two and A Piece of Cake. Preeti Shenoy was in conversation with Sonja Chandrachud. The event began with Chandrachud complimenting Shenoy on her writing style. Chandrachud commented th...
Post by: Deepti Khanna
Deepti Naval is a celebrated actor, photographer, poet and painter. She made her cinematic debut with Ek Baar Phir and has done more than 60 films since then. She has starred in Chashmebaddoor, Kamla, Mirch Masala, Ankahi, Main Zinda Hoon, Panchvati, and more recently in TV serial Muktibandhan. She has authored Lamha-Lamha and Black Wind & Other Poems and a short story collection The Mad Tibetan that was released last year. We talked to her about how she gives...
Post by: Deepti Khanna
Anita Nair is one of the most popular contemporary writers in Indian Writing in English. Her novels, The Better Man and Ladies Coupe have been hugely applauded and translated into 21 languages. Nair reveals how good stories and character driven narratives compel her to put pen to paper. Critics have appreciated your works for delving into the “deepest recesses of man's psyche”. Where do you look for inspiration and how do write about feelings so deep?...
Post by: Deepti Khanna
  This week we celebrate poetry and poets on BookChums, and on the discovery of my status as a published poet, I have been asked to present some of my stuff in one of the blogs. While I received the request with a masked carelessness, I must confess it excites me to the point to delirium to type these words. After all poetry is an exclusive art form, as we pseudo-humble poets like to believe.   This is how I see it. Poetry is the koel’s song, uttered...
Post by: Snehith Kumbla
  The two poets mentioned in the headline represent different writing styles, geographies and timelines. Take the extremely reclusive Arun Kolatkar (1932 -2004), who wrote in Marathi and English with equal bite, started as an artist and then earned his living as a graphic designer. Satirical, sour and humorous, Kolatkar was a keen observer and a master creator of imagery. Here is one of his poems, from his famous 1977 collection - Jejuri: The Butterfly Ther...
Post by: Snehith Kumbla
  The last day of August 2012 saw the hosting of a little special event on the BookChums Twitter page. Our followers were given the first line of a poem and asked to come up with their own lines. The results were interesting, as is displayed below in summation:   Where there is love, there is a song, Guiding us on the path along!                     &...
Post by: BookChums
  Pillow'd upon my fair love's ripening breast, To feel for ever its soft fall and swell, Awake for ever in a sweet unrest, Still, still to hear her tender-taken breath, And so live ever--or else swoon to death. - John Keats   When no one knows for sure, one speculates and lo, legends are made. The above lines from Bright Star were inspired, they say, when Keats was resting his head on the heart of his lover, Fanny Brawne. Such was Keats, a star tha...
Post by: Snehith Kumbla
A thing of beauty is a joy for ever: Its lovliness increases; it will never Pass into nothingness; but still will keep A bower quiet for us, and a sleep Full of sweet dreams, and health, and quiet breathing. - John Keats, Endymion   We come to the third act now, as Keats immersed himself in verse and brought out a first collection called Poems that his publishers were much ashamed of, though a few critics saw promise in him.  Keats promptly chan...
Post by: Snehith Kumbla
A day after attending the Pune book launch of her latest short story collection – Love Stories # 1 to 14, Annie Zaidi promptly agreed for an interview with BookChums. Zaidi talks about when she began to take writing seriously, the difficulties of publishing the first book and on her chances of writing a novel. Read on. How and when did you take to writing seriously? Was there any particular trigger that made you do so?  I began writing in college. By t...
Post by: Snehith Kumbla
Our interview here is with Kala Ramesh; the well known haiku poet. Haiku is a four hundred year old art form of Japan but kept fresh and live both in Japan, and now in India, the West and other countries.   Kala also writes tanka (five line poem), haibun (tight prose embedded with haiku), senryu, and renku (collaborative linked verse). Apart from winning numerous awards and recognitions, Kala is also part of the editorial team for various magazines that publish ...
Post by: Snehith Kumbla
          Robert Penn Warren was born on April 24 in 1905 in Kentucky. He is synonymous with his work All the King’s Men for which he won the Pulitzer Prize in Literature in 1947. He was an American poet, novelist, and literary critic. He was one of the founders of New Criticism that highlighted close reading especially in poetry. Some of his works include John Brown: The Making of a Martyr, Thirty-six Poems, An Approach to Literatur...
Post by: Kabita Sonowal
  There is something about dying early especially among writers and poets. In an ironical turn, we are not to see them grow old ever. We do not see what they have may ultimately turned out to be. Take for example the English poet John Keats; his passing away at 26 was a tragedy, but also gave us a body of work that was romantic and unaffected by what may have turned into the bitterness of old age.   Dear bookworms, we honour today one of the greatest of th...
Post by: Snehith Kumbla
The rain brings out the best in poets, especially among the poets of the subcontinent. For in countries where the winter means desolation, snow and staying indoors, the rain is often seen as another form of desolation. The monsoon in India, on the other hand, is a much awaited phenomenon. Its arrival after a burning, humid frying of summer is considered as a blessing, a calming coolness over scalding tempers.   Many poets have waxed eloquent over the monsoon; le...
Post by: Snehith Kumbla
Ismita Tandon Dhankher's new book, Jacob Hills has created quite a stir with its titillating storyline set in an army camp in the 1980s. After having read the book and amazed by it, we sat down with the author for a quick chat. Here is an excerpt.   Congratulations on your new book, Jacob Hills. It would not be a stretch to say that the book is rather scandalous. Could you walk us through the writing process for this book? Perhaps, 1980s was a scandalous period...
Post by: Manasi Kulkarni
 She walks in beauty, like the night    Of cloudless climes and starry skies; And all that’s best of dark and bright    Meet in her aspect and her eyes; Thus mellowed to that tender light    Which heaven to gaudy day denies.   - She Walks in Beauty by Lord Byron     Synonymous with this poem and writings including Hours of Idleness, English Bards and Scotch Reviewers, Hebrew Melodies, Cain, The Vision of...
Post by: Kabita Sonowal


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