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Life does lead you to your passion, ultimately. Who better to vouch for it than Mr. Prem Rao himself? Turning to writing after 36 years of professional work as a Talent Management Specialist and Executive Coach, he is an avid blogger whose professional blog People at Work and Play  has gathered a huge fan following. And his recent blog Writing To Be Read is soon catching up globally. Alumnus of The Lawrence School, Lovedale; Loyola College, Chennai and XLRI, Jamshe...
Post by: Sonia Safri
April 14th, 2011. The road blocks (literally!), due to Ambedkar Jayanti celebrations did not deter book enthusiasts from attending the book launch of Grey Oak Publishers’ new offering – Down The Road. An electic anthology of 28 campus tales by 16 authors brings back unforgettable memories of life in the campus. We all have had our share of school and college incidents that bring out emotions and feelings attached to the carefree life we truly miss now. And...
Post by: Sonia Safri
All ye aspiring authors around…lend me your ears. I need to share with you a bubble of thought that burst in my head. It derailed my cognitive train and killed about a million brain cells in the vicinity. Investigation is on and I know serious damage has been done. But that story is for another time. What I want to highlight today is the present situation of our nation. Nope, not the political one. We have other flag bearers and upholders of truth, honesty, etc. ...
Post by: Sonia Safri
From Kuwait to India via refugee camps; from being a Brand Manager and winning awards to now writing short stories by the beach and photographing the mountains, Sneh Thakur has lived quite an exciting life. BookChums gets talking and digging for more about this beautiful, chirpy and multi-talented lady. In a nut shell, tell us about Sneh Thakur. I would best describe myself in 6 words as: Pint Sized Rapunzel. On a Cloud. I'm 29 years old, born to a ...
Post by: Sonia Safri
Book Launch - Indira Gandhi - The Final Chapter by Suraj 'Eskay' Sriram Friday, April 29, 2011 Pune.   Crossword, at ICC Towers, saw a houseful of audience gathered for the book launch of Suraj 'Eskay' Sriram's latest book of illustrations - Indira Gandhi - The Final Chapter. A book of illustrations, Indira Gandhi - The Last Chapter, lampoons the political figure through witty cartoons. It draws a satirical portrait of the Indian leader while ...
Post by: Sonia Safri
Last week BookChums got the opportunity to moderate the launch of Suraj 'Eskay' Sriram's latest offering- Indira Gandhi – The Final Chapter. A book of illustrations, this, it lampoons the political figure through witty cartoons. It draws a satirical portrait of the Indian leader, while humorously depicting certain behind-the-scenes political and social affairs in our country. The book launch was a wonderful experience and so was the interactio...
Post by: Sonia Safri
Starting this week we would be posting a series of blogs on how readers could appreciate a book better. Every week we shall pick out two of these parameters and talk to you a little about them. These pointers are sure to tell you that along with the story there is a lot you can read and enjoy in a book. For instance, the character sketches, sub plots, writing style, tempo, vocabulary / choice of words, background, autobiographical references etc. too speaks volumes about...
Post by: Deepti Khanna
Last week we spoke about how the author's writing style and character sketches within any given novel enrich the book reading experience. This week we shall touch upon autobiographical traces and visuals, something that again adds greatly to the entire reading experience.     Autobiographical traces Sons and Lovers by DH Lawrence is a good example of semi autobiographical work. The setting, premise and characters of such novels borrow heavily from ...
Post by: Deepti Khanna
In the past few weeks we spoke about how autobiographical traces, visuals,  writing style and character sketches can enrich a book reading experience. In the final part of the series we shall tell you a little about how sub plots and choice of words bring a sea change in the book reading experience   Sub plots Subplots are important to any novel since they weave dimension and complexity into stories. For instance in the novel There’s No Love On Wal...
Post by: Deepti Khanna
Despite a college romance being released every other day, love stories today have very few takers. And this is completely justified because these stories don’t have any depth – no pain, no longing, no determination, no romance, no feeling at all. The lovers are not committed; are not passionate for each other the way lovers of a romantic flick were known to. Love stories were known to motivate people, to win their love. But the stuff being churned out now, is...
Post by: guddu
Like most first-time-writers Shrenik Mutha’s novel Broken Hearts has a strong autobiographical influence. The novel talks about love, separation, loss, happiness and romance. Dressed in a white blazer and white trousers, this suave, attractive looking guy, spills the beans as he says, “This love story has originated from my own life,” and blushes just as he was seated between his friends and was being teased about his lady love.   We seldom meet ...
Post by: Deepti Khanna
The health books being released today target people, who are health conscious, who are trying to lose weight or maintain their current weight. And if not for all this, readers today want to feel fit, active, look and feel good. Every woman wants to look like she is out of a glossy magazine and can carry every outfit she watches on TV. As for the men, they dream of being active and having a well-toned body.   So in a series of blog posts we shall examine the kind...
Post by: Deepti Khanna
BookChums got a chance to interview the versatile and prolific Chennai based freelance writer, Malathi Jaikumar, who was earlier senior sub-editor/ chief sub-editor, Indian Express, Delhi; Deputy Head Press and Public Affairs of the British High Commission (Delhi); and Communications Consultant for UNDP doing Post Tsunami advocacy work after her retirement. Receipient of the prestigious MBE award, she was also awarded the first prize in the Femina All India Short ...
Post by: Sonia Safri
  Humor does rule the world. At least my world. Reading humorous pieces livens up our day. It breaks the monotone of work and life. Most problems can be fixed with a dose of laughter. But what I like most about humor pieces is the fact that the point under scrutiny is communicated with much effect and quite intelligently. It also reflects a bit of the writer’s character trait. A writer with a good sense of humor will make sure his/her pieces amuse people....
Post by: Sanjana Kapoor
In the last few weeks we spoke to you about how books on healthy eating, fitness regimes and mental wellbeing are the talk of the town and have become a part of everyone’s book shelf. Be it recipes to deal with acidity or fitness programmes to suit a particular body type, or books that teach you how to feel good, there are quite a few lessons you can learn from them. This week we shall take a closer look at the pregnancy-related health books that were released rece...
Post by: Deepti Khanna
  Social Media Revolution is taking the globe under its stride. A lot has been explored and a lot still needs to be uncovered. In this scenario, “Social Media Simplified” is a great attempt by Vijayendra Haryal and Anandan Pillai that points out key aspects of social media strategies, along with case studies based on Indian brands highlighting their success. BookChums got talking with the two authors to unearth the story behind the book.   ...
Post by: Sonia Safri
So, who all have faced the proverbial random blankness of the mind that blocks all thoughts and imagination even though the hand itches and the pen (or the keyboard in today’s context) twitches to let words flow on the white background?      Ok hands down. I see you all have faced that dead-end at some point.  That my friend is the dreaded “Writer’s Block”.    Imagine reaching a dead-end, after especially a ...
Post by: Sonia Safri
This week we chat up with Preeti Shenoy, an avid blogger, author of two bestsellers, an artist, a poet, a writer and a mother of two – or should I say just a mother of two (that’s what she calls her blog). Her two books, 34 Bubblegums and Candies and Life Is What You Make It, though poles apart, met with the same end: they were instant hits and went on to be declared national bestsellers.    Know about why this Bangalore-based author moved on...
Post by: Deepti Khanna
From Muscat to Pune, via South India...Aseem Rastogi, a consultant with Infosys, is a writer, a proficient blogger, a content creator, and a talented young man with an undying love for music.   BookChums caught up with him to know more about his versatility. Read on...     How different was life in Muscat compared to life in India, esp. Pune? If you see at the outset, life in Muscat and India is much the same. With Indians all around, going to...
Post by: Sonia Safri
  For years together man has found great company in books. Books are known to narrate a story, surprise readers and also make them laugh. But a good book can do a lot more than this. There is a thin line of difference between a good and a great book.   Here’s how you can differentiate between them.       You know you have found a great book when… Every time somebody turns on the TV set, you go in the other r...
Post by: Deepti Khanna
Hussain S Zaidi’s books – Black Friday and Mafia Queens Of Mumbai – are controversial, packed with saucy details from the underworld and are full of drama and action to say the least. The non-fictional accounts of the incidents and lives of the people are so spicy, interesting, well-researched and varied that these books are bound to put any fiction to shame… We chat up with journalist-author Hussain S Zaidi who wrote his books after keepi...
Post by: Deepti Khanna
Audio books have been used extensively in schools and public libraries to help children read. Though audio books were invented around 1930s it was only in the 80s that people began using it as a substitute and/or a supplement to reading books. It is no surprise that the concept of audio books was brought about to get more and more people into reading or listening – literary materials. The plus point here was that such books cater to more than one person at a...
Post by: Deepti Khanna
We have all fallen in love when we were 17. We have all experienced the happiness, positivity that first love brings in our lives. But when the same love fades away, we have all cried, felt extreme sorrow and vacuum. But when Pune-based teenager Shrenik Mutha, fell in love with ‘his angel’ and things did not work out for them, he choose to write a novel Broken Hearts based on his diary. The book was released a couple of months ago and has been praised liber...
Post by: Deepti Khanna
Swati Kaushal is one author we loved chatting up with. An email interview with her and we know she is one independent woman who loves people who stand by their mistakes, very much like the protagonists of her novels in Piece of Cake and A Girl Like Me. During the chat, Swati revealed what makes her novels a delightful read and how she goes about shaping the characters of her novels. And all you aspiring writers, don’t get disheartened, she has some very interesting...
Post by: Deepti Khanna
When one refers to Speculative Fiction, it usually dates back to ancient Greece. It is a work of historical invention. As the phrase suggests, dramatists, poets, and authors speculated and usually caught the ire of the audience. Take the instance of Euripides’ Medea. He wrote a dramatic version of Medea where she murdered her own children in a fit of passion and avenged herself. Euripides displeased the Athenian audience with his dramatic tragedy. A lot of previous...
Post by: Kabita Sonowal
For Prakash Iyer, the CEO of Kimberley Clark Lever, there is a winner inside every one of us. It is just a matter of realizing and acting upon. And to help Iyer share his experiences, he first began blogging and then contributing motivational and inspirational columns in Careers 360. Eventually, when Iyer realized that he was doing a good job at improving people’s success rates, he came out with a book titled The Habit of Winning that has some great stories on visi...
Post by: Deepti Khanna
In the concluding part of the series on setting up a library at home, we shall now look at a comprehensive list of 10 must haves in your personal library. Catch-22 by Joseph Heller The novel describes the wartime experiences of an Army Air Corps Captain John Yossarian. Captain John Yossarian, a bomber pilot is trying hard to make it through WWII alive. But the only excuse the Army accepts for refusing to fly a mission is insanity. So Yossarian constantly devises...
Post by: Deepti Khanna
“For myself, I always write about Dublin, because if I can get to the heart of Dublin I can get to the heart of all the cities of the world. In the particular is contained the universal.” – James Joyce     As the political landscape shifted in many parts of the globe in the nineteenth century, Ireland was struck by the Potato Famine or an Gorta Mor (in the Irish language) in 1845 – 49. It left behind immense poverty, death, and diseas...
Post by: Kabita Sonowal
You know a book has lived up to its promise when it engulfs you in a world of its own and keeps you there till the very last page. This is especially true for Mystery, Suspense, Thriller and Crime novels. If they keep you captivated for hours together and give you goose bumps, rest assured that your time was absolutely worth it. The mesmerizing “who-dunnit” reads, or the old fashioned mysteries complete with red herrings, or the more contemporary puzzle ...
Post by: Sonia Safri
BookChums chats up with the warm, friendly Sujata Massey, who has authored a series of 10 mystery novels including the very famous The Salaryman's Wife, The Bride’s Kimono, Shimura Trouble and The Flower Master. Her books follow the story of Rei Shimura, who in the author’s words is “half Japanese, half American and young enough to be brave and fun and romantic.” In the interview Sujata talks about how she came about etching Rei Shimura&rs...
Post by: Deepti Khanna
As the moment of joie de vivre has dawned, it is time to participate in and celebrate the festival of lights. On Diwali, most of us want to take it easy, let our hair down, just about vacation and chill out. It is also the approach of winter and we are already beginning to feel a nip in the air: the world seems to be so much of a happier place. There is the aroma of food wafting in the air, the smell of cracker bursts with a lot of litter bugs and litter all over the pla...
Post by: Kabita Sonowal
As the moment of joie de vivre has dawned, it is time to participate in and celebrate the festival of lights. On Diwali, most of us want to take it easy, let our hair down, just about vacation and chill out. It is also the approach of winter and we are already beginning to feel a nip in the air: the world seems to be so much of a happier place. There is the aroma of food wafting in the air, the smell of cracker bursts with a lot of litter bugs and litter all over the pla...
Post by: Kabita Sonowal
Continuing the list of top mystery / suspense novels, here are the remaining ones that make up for a thrilling read.       A Study in Scarlet by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle Sherlock Holmes makes his debut in the mystery of a corpse found in a run-down, abandoned house. He encounters a strange clue, the word RACHE written in blood on the wall near the body. Only the astute mind of Mr. Holmes can make sense of such a cryptic clue.      ...
Post by: Sonia Safri
Good children’s books have wooed many adults. The story, well-etched characters, marvelous imagination have compelled many individuals to stack their classics and chick-lit right at the bottom and pick up the rich collection by revered authors like Anant Pai, RK Narayan, JK Rowling, Christopher Paolini and Ruskin Bond. Interestingly Dr Louise Joy, a Cambridge University academic, had reasoned that traditional children's tales are popular among older readers ...
Post by: Deepti Khanna
P.G Wodehouse endearingly called Plum by his family and friends is known for his so-called quintessential British humor. He wrote novels, plays, and short stories delighting readers with stories that were reminiscent of his crème de la crème upbringing, schooling, and society. And to top it all, his works are timeless! He wrote some of the most elegant prose in British literature and this is obvious in all of the Jeeves and Blandings Castle books. His chara...
Post by: Kabita Sonowal
In today’s day and age we are all bombarded with information. Be it the Internet, emails, morning newspapers, novels and reference books there is a lot of reading we are expected to do on a daily basis. Due to this surge of information, we just cannot afford to read slowly because loss of time means loss of information. Loss of information further translates to ranking below your peers. In order to help you win this crucial race we shall share with you a few...
Post by: Deepti Khanna
It's not often that you get to read a book so powerful that keeps you up, and moves in your mind even after you are done reading it. Prey By The Ganges, by Hemant Kumar, is one such novel, with its far-reaching imagery and an utterly spine-chilling thrill. I couldn't resist the opportunity to interview the author to know more about the ideation and the writing process. Here's all that the author shared with us.     To begin with, we suddenly saw Hemant ...
Post by: Sonia Safri
Magic Realism as the phrase suggests is not just about mere magic or dreamlike suggestions, content, or fine arts. It delves beyond the arena of fantasy. It observes and describes the banality of human existence via magical lenses. It has been portrayed time and again in literature and paintings and several contemporary writers such as Ben Okri, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Haruki Murakami, and Salman Rushdie write along the lines of magic realism. The beauty of it lies in fi...
Post by: Kabita Sonowal
Speaking of macabre literature, the first person who comes to mind is Roald Dahl. After a reading of Skin, one realizes why his macabre writings are immensely popular. Drioli, a man with a prized tattoo on his back disappears after the promise of a fine life by the dubious owner of the Bristol Hotel in Cannes. And what the reader discovers later is that there is no Bristol Hotel. All that chillingly emerges after his disappearance is a varnished painting, a dead-ringer v...
Post by: Kabita Sonowal
Being a young mother I am continuously on the lookout of good parenting ideas and techniques to help raise my little one. While reading one of my favourite blogs I chanced upon a line that said the Montessori school of thought is against reading fairy tales to children. While I was shocked at this revelation I decided to dig deep into this theory. Here are the arguments: Stories like Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, Cinderella and Rapunzel  are not read out b...
Post by: Deepti Khanna
Rightly said, “never judge a book by its movie” stands tall and true with so many books and their weird movie versions. Here’s a list of some books that ruined the reading experience of the books.     The Time Traveler's Wife   The Time Traveler's Wife was the debut novel of American author Audrey Niffenegger. It is a love story about a man with a genetic disorder that causes him to time travel unpredictably, and about his wife, ...
Post by: Sonam Kapoor
He enters and he is welcomed with a thundering round of applause and a standing ovation. All of a sudden you overhear people say, “He’s here… Wilbur Smith’s here” and he walks in and flashes a warm smile. As soon as he sits and gets comfortable, this writing phenomenon, Wilbur Smith, takes the mike and clarifies, “I am NOT here to sell my books but to gain sympathy as a writer!” And this is how begins this hour-long warm, candid...
Post by: Deepti Khanna
“Let us go then, you and I,  When the evening is spread out against the sky  Like a patient etherized upon a table;” - From The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock (TS Eliot)     The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock has always been regarded as the hallmark of modernist poetry and most of us would agree. It draws a vivid picture of Prufrock who is given to procrastination, has a sense of aging and unrequited love, and pinched by ind...
Post by: Kabita Sonowal
Gothic fiction is usually illustrated along stereotypical lines. A gothic story is usually imagined to have a medieval setting of a Gothic castle, a damsel in distress, a villain with blood-curdling intent, and a knight in shining armor. While all of these could be true while cohesively presenting a gothic story, it would be unfair to write off this genre as puerile or kitsch. It is not as unappetizing as it appears to be. It has evolved over the ages and surprisingly, s...
Post by: Kabita Sonowal
When I had just started off as a writer I would hear these admired editors say: “Your writings style is different… Your style is now like that of a professional writer… “ Okay, now I knew this was something positive and something I could be proud of, but what does ‘writing style’ mean is something I could never exactly gather. Maybe it is the words you choose, maybe it is your unique style similar to your fashion sense or maybe it is...
Post by: Deepti Khanna
The first time I met author Manasi Vaidya was at a book launch event in Pune. She happened to tell me that Penguin was releasing her romantic comedy No Deadline For Love under the Metro Reads section. As soon as I got back to office, I read her blog, I fell in love with her writing style. Her topical subjects, situations and reactions were incredibly funny. From how she ran to the loo to key in her novel or how she came across a group of daughter-in-laws who faked linger...
Post by: Deepti Khanna
Not so long ago, Barbara Cartland wove history, fiction, and romance to set a stage of really popular romantic fiction. Although it carried a lot of mushy romance, to the keen reader or observer, it also shed light on the prevalent society and history. It set the ground for future writings on historical fiction. A largely noticeable chunk of Mills & Boon literature from the yesteryears also has settings of romance against an exotic milieu of historic locations and th...
Post by: Kabita Sonowal
    Here are some more books that you shouldn’t miss. A Suitable Boy – Vikram Seth Nineteen Eighty-Four – George Orwell War And Peace – Leo Tolstoy Clan of the Cave Bear – Jean M. Auel The Unbearable Lightness of Being – Milan Kundera The Little Prince – Antoine de Saint-Exupery The Secret History – Donna Tartt Possession – A. S. Byatt Perfume – Patrick Suskind The House...
Post by: Sonam Kapoor
People know him as "a Chartered Accountant and Management Consultant by accident, a civil servant by day and a writer by night. A voracious reader and a lover of cinema. And of course the Managing Director, Grey Oak Publishers." But this barely sums up the personality of author Ahmed Faiyaz. Those familiar with his previous work will vouch for his insight to observe and meticulously jot human emotions and relationships. And with his latest offering Scammed: ...
Post by: BookChums
Nostradamus’ prophesies inspired and awed several writers with a penchant for apocalyptic fiction. However, the apocalyptic genre is not a new genre. It is evident from the works of the Babylonians and the Mayans. Mesoamerican literature is a rich source of history, prophesy, time, astronomy, and the apocalypse. Drawing a reference to the Mayan calendar, it has caught the fancy of several painters, writers, and film makers. The movie Apocalypto was a stark portra...
Post by: Kabita Sonowal
One of the comments on the back cover of Kankana Basu’s books - “With Basu around, you don’t really need Jhumpa Lahiri” – is sure to raise the bar about what you expect from the work, but her writings definitely meet all the expectations.  Cappuccino Dusk (novel) and Vinegar Sunday (collection of short stories) offer a very interesting take on Bengali families, their lifestyle and culture, and the way they these people have adapte...
Post by: Deepti Khanna
To an aficionado of archaeology and for a good archaeology read, the first book that comes to mind is Agatha Christie’s Come, Tell Me How You Live. In her own words, she said that it was not meant to be taken seriously. She said that it was a ‘light-hearted and frivolous’ read and that she meant to relive the ‘poignant remembrance of our days in Arpachiyah and Syria’; however it also set an interest in archaeology among children in several p...
Post by: Kabita Sonowal
Love’s Journey is the debut novel of Rashmi Singh, a freelance Personality Development and Soft Skills Trainer at Faridabad. From talking about her personal and professional life to her take on love, Rashmi gives us an insight on present day society woes and much more. Read on. Tell us a bit about your professional background. How did you steer towards becoming a Personality Development and Soft Skills Trainer? I had been quite active during my school/colle...
Post by: Sonia Safri
  Friday, 20th January, 2012 Landmark, Pune:  I was recently invited to the book launch of two of the most awaited anthologies -  Urban Shots Crossroads and Urban Shots Brightlights.   I walked in to the store, towards the book launch area, recognizing a few familiar faces, and smiling at the new ones. I could sense the excitement. It reminded me of the launch of the first Urban Shots anthology by Grey Oaks and the launch of Down the Road th...
Post by: Sonia Safri
I recently read about some cult literary traditions for literature fans. And I wish to share those with you today. But before I begin with the traditions and their essence, let me give you an idea of what literary tradition is. As I tumbled upon recently, literary tradition is a collection of works that have an underlying interconnectedness and coherence. It is not simply a group of works sharing geography or group. Writers may not belong to a particular place or er...
Post by: Sanjana Kapoor
Now we all want to access Facebook, Twitter and our personal email accounts from office. But in most organizations our kind bosses and even kinder management, put these websites in shackles. But Ankit Fadia’s new book, How to Unblock Everything on the Internet, which was recently launched in Crossword store, SB Road, explains how one could break open these virtual chains and access all the information you want.   Ankit Fadia, is a cyber security expert a...
Post by: Deepti Khanna
Arnab Ray aka Greatbong, was in town to launch his new release The Mine at Crossword, SB Road. This book is a deviation from his previous collection of essays on Bollywood and politics May I Hebb Your Attention Pliss. The Mine is a horror-ridden, psychological thriller which was a reaction to the fact that Indians are not interested in good and genuine horror. Ray made it clear that horror here did not mean the horror pertaining to vampires, haunted homes and...
Post by: Deepti Khanna
When it comes to macabre fiction, A Sight for Sore Eyes is a brilliant tale of the macabre, morose, and low life. Here I’m reading one of the many best books by Ruth Rendell. Teddy Brex’s eyes feast on Francine; she is the treat and a sight for his sore eyes. She is an object to him: an object to be treasured, loved, and admired. There is a strong undercurrent of obsession and the question that good looking Teddy Brex has an eye for beauty yet regards human b...
Post by: Kabita Sonowal
Two years ago, Arnab Ray decided to play it safe. After tasting immense success and a steady fan following on his blog: greatbong.net he compiled his first book, May I Hebb Your Attention Pliss with detailed essays on two of his favourite topics – Bollywood and politics.  He says, “In my first release I experimented with styles of comedy but not with the subject. My latest The Mine is experimental with respect to writing style and subject matter.&rdquo...
Post by: Deepti Khanna
From discussion on varied writing styles, hike in divorce rates and writing about sex, the Pune book launch of Preeti Shenoy’s third book Tea For Two and A Piece of Cake had it all. The blogger and writer, a Bangalore-based writer was in town to promote her third release, Tea For Two and A Piece of Cake. Preeti Shenoy was in conversation with Sonja Chandrachud. The event began with Chandrachud complimenting Shenoy on her writing style. Chandrachud commented th...
Post by: Deepti Khanna
Interview with Prionka Ray We chatted up with debutant author Prionka Ray who has penned Sia, a novel that tells us about the different hues of the relationship shared by sisters. The book is also a departure from the kind of novels being released these days.  In the conversation, author Prionka Ray talks about being an educator, living in many cities and what kind of writing appeals to her. You have written on your blog that biographies in general are r...
Post by: Deepti Khanna
“What is the victory of a Cat on A Hot Tin Roof?—I wish I knew... Just staying on it, I guess, as long as she can...” ― Tennessee Williams, Cat on a Hot Tin Roof   Tennessee Williams was born on this day in 1911. He stooped to conquer it all; his writings were all about passion, love, promiscuity, explosive emotions, tenacity, and compassion. And there would barely be anybody else who would capture human emotions the way he did. Cat on a...
Post by: Kabita Sonowal
    Some weeks ago, I attended a retrospective on Amma (Kamala Suraiya nee Das) at which Suresh Kohli screened a video interview of hers, where she spoke of her grandmother and her great-grandmother. I told Suresh that this was typical of Amma, for to her by far the most important influences in life came from the maternal side. She never let me and my brothers forget how disappointed she was that all her children were male, or how happy she was in being bor...
Post by: BookChums
Where I grew up, cool kids played sports and losers read books. Can you guess which side I belonged to? When my mother came to find me for swimming lessons, I would hide in a bank of violets with The Dark is Rising. I’d nestle in the same spot with The Railway Children while the other kids in the neighborhood enjoyed softball games. I declared my “time of the month” lasted two weeks, with dreadful cramps, to excuse my absence from gym class. Naturally...
Post by: Sujata Massey
          “May your spirit live, may you spend millions of years, you who love Thebes, sitting with your face to the north wind, your eyes beholding happiness.” Epitaph on Howard Carter’s tomb   Howard Carter was the man who lived it up and he emerged as someone larger than life itself. Egyptologist and archaeologist, he discovered Tutankhamen’s tomb from the 14th century BC. He was characterized in literatur...
Post by: Kabita Sonowal
  Sagarika Chakraborty dons several hats. She cooks, writes, researches on gender studies, has practiced corporate law and recently completed an MBA from the Indian Business School at Hyderabad. In this interview, she discusses her childhood, her interests, her writings, and her passions straight from the heart. A Calendar too Crowded is her first book.   - Tell us about your childhood. Tell us about the places in which you’ve lived. I had a typical...
Post by: Kabita Sonowal
    May 14, 2012, Pune, India: BookChums interviewed Sagarika Chakraborty, author of A Calendar too Crowded. In this interview, she discussed her childhood, her interests, her writings, and her passions straight from the heart.   A Calendar too Crowded is Sagarika Chakraborty’s first book. It has been inspired by myriad women she has interacted with during research paper writing from all walks of life. She described her intention behind narrati...
Post by: BookChums
Kapil Sibal’s decision to direct NCERT and wholesalers to hold back textbooks featuring cartoons is a move that has stirred attention. The committee set up by the government is to submit its report on June 15, 2012. The discussion in Lok Sabha has touched the topic that impressionable minds of students may not be the best to interpret and understand political humor like cartoons. HRD Minister Kapil Sibal found many of the cartoons in the textbooks offensive an...
Post by: Bookchums
                        The stars are not wanted now; put out every one, Pack up the moon and dismantle the sun. Pour away the ocean and sweep up the wood; For nothing now can ever come to any good. By WH Auden (1921 – 1973) Mexican writer Carlos Fuentes was synonymous with his widely acclaimed writings such as The Death of Artemio Cruz, Aura, The Old Gringo, and Christopher Unborn...
Post by: Kabita Sonowal
LOS ANGELES -  Steve Job’s life will be screened by none other than the Oscar-winning screen writer Aaron Sorkin based on the best-selling biography by the co-founder of Apple and maker of iPods and iPads. The book ‘Steve Jobs’ was published late last year and has been Amazon's best-selling book of 2011, with a sale of more than 2.2 million hardcover copies. It looks like Sony Pictures Entertainment on Tuesday disclosed its plans to involv...
Post by: BookChums
                          Thrilling conspiracies, espionage cover, and speedy literature: Robert Ludlum lived and wrote some of the most exciting and enthralling piece of action literature in which a reader could immerse. And a lot of his literature translated into films. Today, he would’ve lived to see decades of his popularity arising from literature. He certainly lived to tell severa...
Post by: Kabita Sonowal
  In 1913, Satyajit Ray’s grandfather Upendrakishore Raychowdhury started a Bengali children’s magazine called Sandesh. Roychowdhury passed away in 1915 and it was his son Sukumar Ray who took over the editorial mantle. Stories interspersed with fun, jokes and information made Sandesh a delightful read in a TV absent generation of readers. Subinoy Ray, Sukumar's younger brother took charge in 1923 when the latter passed away. The magazine travele...
Post by: Snehith Kumbla
                                        BookChums is a portal for buying books at competitive prices. Though there are many websites selling fiction at a discount, BookChums is probably the only one place where you could buy a good range of academic books at slashed prices.       The objective behind BookChums starting this servic...
Post by: Deepti Khanna
  Nathaniel Hawthorne was born on July 4, 1804, in Salem, Massachusetts. His author's great-great-great-grandfather, William Hathorne, was the first in the family to emigrate from England to Salem.   William's son, John Hathorne, was one of the judges who oversaw the Salem Witch Trials. When Nathaniel got to know of this, he is said to have added the letter ‘w’ to his surname. It is said that he wanted to dissociate himself from his ‘n...
Post by: Deepti Khanna
                            The role of India’s relations with other nations has been highly interactive in the last couple of years. It is evident in its stance with relentless economic growth, nuclear power, its adoption of diplomacy and its interaction with countries such as the U.S., U.K., Russia, China, and many others. Pax Indica by Shashi Tharoor explores why India’...
Post by: Shakti Shetty
                            This week, BookChums chatted with debutant novelist Sandeep Das the author of Yours Sarcastically. In this exclusive interview with BookChums, he discusses his first book, what prompted him to write it and its take on corporate India. Yours Sarcastically is the journey of an MBA graduate in his twenties from a top Indian B-school and his 'coming-of-age' tale ...
Post by: Kabita Sonowal
                                September 24, 2012, Pune, India: BookChums interviewed debutant novelist Sandeep Das the author of Yours Sarcastically. In this exclusive interview with BookChums, he discussed his first novel, the inspiration behind the story, his other interests and advice to aspiring authors.     Yours Sarcastically is a sarcastic take on corpo...
Post by: Kabita Sonowal
When I first met Lila Poonawalla, I was a young mother of a 4-year-old struggling to balance my roles as mother and career journalist, while she was managing director of a multi-national company. I watched in fascination as she went from strength to strength, setting up joint ventures, new companies, taking on additional responsibilities till she retired, around 2 decades later.     And then the corporate diva returned to the limelight in a new avtaar that...
Post by: BookChums
     I first heard of Anagha Ghosh some eighteen months ago, just after the launch of my debut book, Leading Ladies. A close friend called to say a friend of his wanted to write a book and could I please talk to her to build up her morale.I took Anagha’s call while trapped in one of Mumbai’s crazy traffic snarls and even in the midst of all the din of traffic, I remember being instantly struck by the energy in her voice, her friendliness and ...
Post by: Sudha Menon
  Before breast cancer cut short the life of gifted British writer Siobhan Dowd at 47, she had already completed what was to be her last book. Bog Child posthumously won for her the 2009 Carnegie Medal in Literature. The book was also recognised as the best book for young adults and children in Britain.   Dowd was born in 1960 in London.Her parents were Irish.In 1984, she joined PEN (Postsecondary Education Network International) as the international write...
Post by: Snehith Kumbla
  A French philosopher, author and journalist, the 1913-born Albert Camus was also known for the absurdism philosophy. Before his death in an automobile accident in 1960, Camus became the second-youngest recepient of the Nobel Prize in 1957. The youngest recepient of the Nobel Prize is Rudyard Kipling. Despite been associated with various labels during his lifetime, Camus rejected all such associations and tags.   Camus's writing career began during the Se...
Post by: Snehith Kumbla
    Tintin, the delightful, intelligent and beguiling investigative reporter, a character by Georges Prosper Remi or Herge turns 84 today. Tintin was born on January 10 in 1929 and is the protagonist of the Tintin series. This is a tribute to him for delighting the world with his adventures and educating us with his imagination. He is versatile. He is imaginative, multi-lingual and well-read, yet absent-minded at times. He is a swimmer, a mountaineer and a ...
Post by: Kabita Sonowal
              “You can't wait for inspiration. You have to go after it with a club.”   -    Jack London   Born as John Griffith Chaney and popularly known as Jack London was born on January 12, 1876. Synonymous with literary works such as The Call of the Wild, White Fang, Burning Daylight, Lost Face, South Sea Tales and The Leopard Man’s Story among others. He was a multi-faceted i...
Post by: Kabita Sonowal
              “Learning from other people’s mistakes saves you a lot of time. Plus, you are saved from the consequences of the mistakes that you avoided making in the first place!”   -    Ruchika Mathur, Desis, Dilemmas and More!   Desis, Dilemmas and More! is a collection of short stories based on the experiences of first-time Indian travelers to the States. Inspired by real-life...
Post by: Kabita Sonowal
    “Uncle, there’s no such thing as the Third World. There are only two worlds, and both of them exist everywhere. In one live those who create injustice, and all the rest, the ones who have to put up with injustice, live in the other.”   -    Uday Prakash, The Walls of Delhi   Uday Prakash’s gut-wrenching, stark and stoical book titled The Walls of Delhi will be discussed on January 25, at the JLF. It ...
Post by: Kabita Sonowal
                    On January 27, 2013, Jason Burke will introduce William Dalrymple’s latest book titled Return of a King at the JLF. This much-discussed book concentrates on the history of former Khurasan (current-day Afghanistan) from the days of Dost Muhammad and Shah Shuja ul-Mulk, the grandson of the emperor of the Durrani Empire, Ahmad Shah Abdali. Return of a King highlights the British interest...
Post by: Kabita Sonowal
          “I was a has-been before I’d been a been.”   Richard G. Stern   Richard G. Stern was a writer who was more popular among writers than he was among readers. A reviewer had once referred to him as – ‘the best American author of whom you have never heard’. He authored Golk, Europe or Up and Down with Baggish and Schreiber, In any Case, Stitch, Other Men's Daughters, Natural Shoc...
Post by: Kabita Sonowal
            Stanley Karnow was synonymous with war journalism and his coverage of the Vietnam War placed him on the master list of Nixon’s political opponents. He covered Asia working with Time, Life, the Saturday Evening Post, the London Observer, the Washington Post, and NBC News. He was chief correspondent for Vietnam: A Television History series which won several awards and accolades such as six Emmy Awards, a Peabody Award...
Post by: Kabita Sonowal
                              On February 2, 2013, former American Navy SEAL and the most lethal sniper in American Military history was shot dead at Glen Rose in Texas. He was Chris Kyle. His autobiography titled American Sniper: The Autobiography of the Most Lethal Sniper in U.S. Military History (co-authored with Scott McEwen and Jim DeFelice) is a revelation of the number of p...
Post by: Kabita Sonowal
February 4, 2013 is World Cancer Day. It is celebrated on this day and month, every year. It is a day to dispel all myths about cancer and take a moment to pause and educate ourselves about cancer, its causes and how to take preventive measures and seek remedies. Today, cancer is curable too; what is required at this moment is the appropriate information to battle and eliminate it.   The Emperor of all Maladies by physician, researcher and award-winning writer, ...
Post by: Kabita Sonowal
          “Basically, I have been compelled by curiosity.” Mary Leakey: British archaeologist, anthropologist and writer   Mary Leakey was born on February 6, 1913. She was born to painter, Erskine Edward Nicol and Cecilia Marion (Frere) Nicol. Mary Leakey was related to antiquarian, John Frere and archaeologist, Sheppard Frere and distantly related to Baronet Henry Bartle Frere, the founder of the modern Indian postal ...
Post by: Kabita Sonowal
            “What is straight? A line can be straight, or a street, but the human heart, oh, no, it's curved like a road through mountains.” ― Tennessee Williams, A Streetcar Named Desire    Thomas Lanier "Tennessee" Williams III (March 26, 1911 – February 25, 1983), popularly known as Tennessee Williams has been synonymous with some of the most remarkable writings from the twentieth centu...
Post by: Kabita Sonowal
            Jules Gabriel Verne, popularly known as Jules Verne was born on February 8, 1828. Also referred to as the ‘Father of Science Fiction’, he would have been 186 years old today! Writing in the science-fiction and adventure genres, his writings continue to thrill and captivate the minds of millions with his heightened and fresh imagination. He enhanced the minds of several writers from different genres later. &n...
Post by: Kabita Sonowal
            “People think that I must be a very strange person. This is not correct. I have the heart of a small boy. It is in a glass jar on my desk.”   -    Stephen King   Stephen King has been synonymous with the literary genres of horror, fantasy, science fiction, drama, gothic, genre fiction, dark fantasy, post-apocalyptic fiction. His most famous works include Salem’s Lot, Four Pa...
Post by: Kabita Sonowal
          Thank you for the queries and as always, I look forward to your questions.   I’m looking for some racy short stories and novels. Thrillers will do. Thanks. - Govind Saraogi, Jaipur Thank you for writing. You can try Jeffrey Archer’s works such as A Prisoner of Birth, A Quiver full of Arrows, As the Crow Flies and Honour among Thieves. Or you could also take a look at some of Lee Child’s novels such as A ...
Post by: Kabita Sonowal
                          It is quite a daunting task to list the works of the Indian literary stalwarts who  were/are women. History tells us that the first known woman writer and poet was Enheduanna who was a princess and a priestess of the moon god Nanna. She was the daughter of King Sargon from the kingdom of Akkad in Mesopotamia. She lived around 2300-2225 B.C! Here is our list of s...
Post by: Kabita Sonowal
            Thank you for the questions this week. It’s nice to answer varied queries. Have a great time reading and do write.     Could you send me the titles of some quick reads – thrillers? - Nidhi K, Bangalore Thank you for writing, Nidhi. Ruth Rendell’s psycho thrillers such as The Bridesmaid, The Killing Doll, and Adam and Eve and Pinch Me are really quick reads. Enjoy!     I need to...
Post by: BookChums
The first notable distinction about the two names you see on the blog post title is of mortality. Browning has been resting in peace six feet under for over a century and half now, Marquez is very much alive, he turned 86 today.   Elizabeth Barrett Browning (1806 -1861) was an English poet whose first poem was published when she was eight years old. It seems Elizabeth suffered from an undiagnosed illness all her life and the treatment that included intake of mor...
Post by: Snehith Kumbla
  BookChums is celebrating the lost art of letter writing all this week. As you can see, we are commemorating it with a display of a blank page of parchment and a black feather quill beside the BookChums logo. How do you revive a lost art whose time is up? In the age of technology and instant messaging, where messages can be sent anywhere and everywhere on the planet at the press of a button, the right question would be - Is there a need to resurrect letter writing...
Post by: Snehith Kumbla
          Thank you for writing, folks. This week, we feature some really interesting questions and answers. Do write. Please choose a book for me in the crime genre that is without too much of gore. Thanks. – Vinitha S, Bangalore Hey, you could read Agatha Christie’s Appointment with Death, The Pale Horse, The Murder of Roger Ackroyd and The Hollow among other books. These are simply marvelous.     I need to g...
Post by: BookChums
With the passing away of Chinua Achebe on 21st March 2013 at the age of 82, Africa lost it’s most popular and distinctive voice in English literature. Born in Nigeria, Achebe lived for some time in the US in the 1970’s. He returned to the US following a 1990 accident that left him partially disabled. In 1967, Achebe was part of a struggle for a new nation – Biafra, but after a bloody struggle, the region became a part of Nigeria again. Until his death...
Post by: Snehith Kumbla
        Thank you for writing, folks. Here’s wishing all of you a very Happy Holi. Keep writing.     Hey. I’m looking for some novels on the Far-East. Please suggest. - Lata Dev, Lucknow Thank you for writing. You can try When we were Orphans by Kazuo Ishiguro and The Garden of Evening Mists by Tan Twan Eng. Both of these stories have great narration and plots.     Please suggest some novels that are based ...
Post by: BookChums
                        Team BookChums wishes Mario Vargas Llosa a very happy birthday. Born on March 28, 1936 in Peru, he became famous in the literary world with his works such as The Time of the Hero, The Green House and Conversation in the Cathedral among other works. He has also written The Way to Paradise based on the French impressionist painter Paul Gauguin; and Flora Tristan, Gauguin&rsquo...
Post by: Kabita Sonowal
        Hope you folks have been enjoying yourselves. Here are the questions and answers for this week. Keep writing.   I’m looking for some war poems. Do you have any poet in mind whose writings I can go through? – Manik Singh, Chandigarh Please look for Wilfred Owen’s poetry. He wrote during the First World War. He wrote about the horrors and futility of war. Some of his poems such as I Saw His Round Mouth's C...
Post by: BookChums
  It was on a Sunday, October 30, 1938 to be precise that the Martians attacked earth. Only, the attacks were part of the radio play adaptation of HG Wells’ sci-fi novel The War of the Worlds. The play was directed /narrated by Orson Welles, yes the same director who went to make Citizen Kane (1941), considered by many critics to be the best movie ever made.   Many listeners who tuned that to the evening broadcast missed the part that the narration...
Post by: Snehith Kumbla
  Pardon the cliché, but why, would those unaware ask – so much song and dance about a certain music band called The Beatles? If you are a music lover, you would certainly understand why we remember The Beatles with much gratitude and pleasure. Now, I can’t speak for all, for it would be better to chronicle in brief here the effect the band has had on me.   For starters, The Beatles were a British band who ‘came together’ i...
Post by: Snehith Kumbla
   “History is moving pretty quickly these days and the heroes and villains keep on changing parts.”     ― Ian Fleming, Casino Royale     Casino Royale, Ian Fleming’s first spy novel will turn sixty tomorrow. Published for the first time on April 13, 1953, it was inspired by Fleming’s experiences as a naval intelligence officer while a part of it is a figment of his imagination. It narrates the adventures o...
Post by: Kabita Sonowal
                           Smita Sahay’s writings have been featured on Ripples: Short Stories by Indian Women Writers by APK Publishers, Asia Writes and Muse India. In this exclusive interview with BookChums, she discussed the inspiration behind her short stories titled Black Blood and The Caretaker from the Ripples collection, her favorite writers, earliest writings, suggestions ...
Post by: Kabita Sonowal
Recently, team BookChums chatted up with Indian author and journalist, Oswald Pereira. He has authored The Newsroom Mafia (his debut novel thriller) followed by Revenge of the Naked Princess. The latter is based on the tale of forced conversions in India with an element of the supernatural. While we discussed his latest work of historical fiction, he also revealed how long it took him to complete this book, how difficult it is to write a novel, beating the writers&rsqu...
Post by: Kabita Sonowal
        Hello folks! Hope all of you’ve been enjoying yourselves. As always, do keep me posted on your reads and recommendations too. Here are the questions and answers for this week.   Please suggest some women-centric reads (short stories will do) by Indian writers. Thank you. - Uma Bora, Gurgaon Thank you for writing, Uma. Please refer to Best Indian Short Stories: Volume I compiled by Khushwant Singh. Read the stories: Desc...
Post by: BookChums
Hello, bookworms! Welcome to the brand new edition of Ask Kabita. Even as summer promises to recede and monsoon looks all set to take over, here are the answers to your queries.   Which books are the best introductions to existentialist literature to begin? Thanks. - Renuka, Pune. Thank you for writing. You can begin with Albert Camus’ The Stranger, The Fall and The Plague. Or you could try Nausea by Jean- Paul Sartre.   Please recommend some boo...
Post by: BookChums
It is most unlikely that the Scottish physician Sir Arthur Ignatius Conan Doyle would have ended up as a prolific writer if his medical career would have done any better.Happily for us, Doyle primarily wrote, especially while waiting for his patients during his (not exactly bustling) practice.   The most famous and enduring of all works of Doyle was and is undoubtedly Sherlock Holmes.In contrast to more methodical fictional detectives, Holmes is shown to be almo...
Post by: Snehith Kumbla
scandal skan-d(u)l 1. Disgraceful gossip about the private lives of other people 2. A disgraceful event   Gossip has its roots as one of human beings’ favourite pastimes, and it still persists and flourishes. While gossip has long been considered a female trait, changing social systems have deemed us to say that it is no longer be attributed to a gender. With the coming of technological advancements and new tools of communication, the latest gossip can...
Post by: Snehith Kumbla
  Conflict, an inherent component of all life, is no wonder to be found generously in literature since time immemorial. No book you read, no theater, no film is complete without it. In fact, according to Aristotle, for any story to hold interest the hero must have a single conflict. It is unclear if he means only one conflict, or at least one conflict. What is clear is that he values the role of conflict in a good story. Many critics are of the opinion that the e...
Post by: Manasi Kulkarni
  LET us go then, you and I, When the evening is spread out against the sky Like a patient etherized upon a table; Let us go, through certain half-deserted streets, The muttering retreat Of restless nights in one-night cheap hotels And sawdust restaurants with oyster-shells: Streets that follow like a tedious argument Of insidious intent To lead you to an overwhelming question…. Oh, do not ask, “What is it?” Let us go and make our vi...
Post by: BookChums
For all the feminist talk and liberal ideas, it continues to be that we all crave for the fathers and father-figures in our lives. As kids, with our unprejudiced minds and in our ideology free worlds, we look up to our fathers with a different respect, an adoration that we do not grant our mothers. The role of father -figures in a child's healthy mental development has long been recognized by science. The father-figures are found to lead to emotionally rounded and h...
Post by: Manasi Kulkarni
What do you do with a day like today? Celebrate or mourn? The World Population Day was created by the United Nations to raise awareness about the alarming population growth humans experienced. While childbirth is a time to rejoice, the creation of this day only reminds of the doom and gloom our decisions to rejoice have brought upon us.   The world is already at a population of 7 billion and counting. While some countries are reporting dramatic decreases in ...
Post by: Manasi Kulkarni
    Strained international relations have proved to be ample fodder for several writers to make their careers out of them. But that isn't only why John le Carre's books are widely read. The writer replicates realities in his books. His detectives are people who are aware that they are mere pawns in an intricate political system. Their work is certainly not righteous or morally correct and the protagonists are fully aware of this fact. There is less of fast pa...
Post by: Imtiaz Ahmed
  The Man Booker Prize 2013 sprung a surprise with New Zealand writer Eleanor Catton becoming the youngest writer ever to win the prize. Catton is 28, and also the second New Zealander to win the prize. Presently based in Auckland, Catton's 832-page murder mystery The Luminaries beat five other favourites to the top spot. Indian American author Jhumpa Lahiri's The Lowland was among the books that were edged out from the shortlist.    Eleanor...
Post by: Imtiaz Ahmed
     On BookChums Award Thursdays this week, we feature American writer Truman Capote. He is synonymous with his diverse literary works including In Cold Blood; Breakfast at Tiffany's; Other Voices, Other rooms; The Glass Harp; The Dogs Bark; Music for Chameleons and House of Flowers. He realized his calling as a writer at the age of eleven. He earned accolades in regard to his literary merit very early from the Scholastic Art & Writing Awards. He ...
Post by: Kabita Sonowal
  On Award Thursdays this week, BookChums features popular Turkish screenwriter, writer and academic Orhan Pamuk. Needless to say, his most popular literary works include Snow, The White Castle, The Black Book, Istanbul: Memories and the City, The New Life, Other Colors: Essays and a Story, The Museum of Innocence, and The Naive and Sentimental Novelist. He was born in 1952 in Istanbul. He is currently the Robert Yik-Fong Tam Professor in Humanities at Columbia U...
Post by: Kabita Sonowal
  Cartoon strips offer comic relief, flights of fantasy and quick reading. As kids, we grew up on fun and rich doses of Chacha Chaudhary, Tinkle, Amar Chitra Katha, Asterix, Peanuts and many others. Newspapers have always carried strips of cartoons of a weekly basis arousing a lot of curiosity to read more. It is said that the history of comics dates back a long way. Scholars hint at the Lascaux Cave paintings as some of the first inspirations for cartoon writing...
Post by: Kabita Sonowal
BookChums features Abid Surti on Award Thursdays this week. He is a painter, writer, cartoonist, journalist, environmentalist, playwright and screenwriter. Synonymous with the Indrajal comic character Bahadur, he has also written novels and short stories in Hindi, Gujarati and English. His writings include The Black Book, In Name of Rama, The Golf Widow, He is Radha, Munchon Wali Begam, Kathavachak, Adhi Stri, Bahattar Saal Ka Bachcha, Besabab, Biswin Sadi Ka Akhiri Da...
Post by: Kabita Sonowal
    It is yet another week once again and it gives me a lot of pleasure to interact with you. How has last week been for you guys? Was it fun? Are you enjoying yourselves this week? Here are the questions and answers for this week.   Q 1:  Can you help me with some books on geographical facts for a twelve year old? Thank you. Neerja Punja, Pune   Answer: Thank you for writing, Neerja. Please check National Geographic Kids Everything Rocks...
Post by: Kabita Sonowal
"All history is contemporary history." - Benedetto Croce, Italian Philosopher and Politician The world today and all the events that we are are a witness to right now are history in the making: civil strife, occupation, political hegemony and chaos. In Greek, historia or history refers to an inquiry or information learned after an investigation. It is a study of the past, especially in terms of human history. It is also a very popular and interesting academ...
Post by: Kabita Sonowal
  On Award Thursdays this week, we feature American children’s writer Lois Lowry. Her books include the Quartet series, Anastasia series, Sam Krupnik series, Tate Family series and Gooney Bird series. Some of her standalone books are A Summer to Die; Here in Kennebunkport; Find a Stranger, Say Goodbye; Autumn Street; The Birthday Ball; Taking Care of Terrific; Number the Stars;  Bless This Mouse; The Silent Boy; Gossamer; Us and Uncle Fraud; The Willou...
Post by: Kabita Sonowal
  On Award Thursdays this week, BookChums features American chef, writer and television personality, Anthony Michael Bourdain. He is synonymous with his television shows including Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations and The Layover. His most famous books include Kitchen Confidential: Adventures in the Culinary Underbelly; A Cook’s Tour: In Search of the Perfect Meal; Typhoid Mary: In Search of the Urban Historical; Anthony Bourdain's Les Halles Cookbook; The ...
Post by: Kabita Sonowal
  "Believe in yourself! Have faith in your abilities! Without a humble but reasonable confidence in your own powers you cannot be successful or happy." - Norman Vincent Peale  “We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars.”  - Orcar Wilde All of us need an ounce of inspiration to get on with our lives from time to time. Inspirational and motivational books advice and show us how to achieve our lives' tr...
Post by: Kabita Sonowal
  On Award Thursdays this week, BookChums features best-selling writer, journalist, screen writer, dramatist, musician, and radio and television broadcaster, Mitch Albom. His books include Tuesdays with Morrie, Have a Little Faith, The Five People you Meet in Heaven, For One More Day, The Time Keeper and The First Phone Call from Heaven. He has won the Associated Press Sports Editors Writing contest thirteen times. Further, his book titled The Five People you mee...
Post by: Kabita Sonowal
  The literary thriller genre keeps us mesmerized and hooked on to its books until we reach their endings. The beauty and uniqueness of this genre lie in diversity: murders, heists, abductions, psychology, history, archaeology and much more. There is such a wide variety of books to choose from in this genre: Frederick Forsyth, Ken Follett, Michael Crichton, Clive Cussler, Dan Brown, Raymond Chandler, Edgar Allan Poe, Ian Fleming, Joy Fielding, John Grisham, Lee C...
Post by: Kabita
  Hope you guys are enjoying yourselves despite the summer heat. I have been cribbing about the heat pretty much as I can't seem to be too outdoorsy for my own good these days. Here are the questions and answers for this week: Q 1: Please suggest some cool poetry collections to beat the heat right now. Thanks. Renuka Sahai, Pune Answer: Thank you for writing, Renuka. You can try Charles Bukowski's collections including It Catches My Heart in Its Hands, At Terror ...
Post by: Kabita
  Canadian author, Yann Martel celebrated his birthday last week on June 25. Synonymous with his award winning and unique masterpiece, The Life of Pi, his other works include Seven Stories, The Facts Behind the Helsinki Roccamatios, Self, We ate the Children Last, and Beatrice and Virgil among other writings. He was born in Salamanca in Spain. He grew up in Costa Rica, France, Canada and Mexico. As an adult, he lived in India, Turkey and Iran. Today, he lives in ...
Post by: Kabita
 “If you hate a person, you hate something in him that is part of yourself. What isn't part of ourselves doesn't disturb us.”   - Hermann Hesse     Famous for his most popular masterpiece, Siddhartha, Hermann Hesse was born on July 2, 1877. He was also a poet and painter. His other works are Beneath the Wheel, Freund, Peter Camenzind, Demian, Der Steppenwolf, Journey to the East, Gertrud, Out of India, Narcissus and Goldmund, Th...
Post by: Kabita
 Jerome David (J.D.) Salinger spent his childhood in dairy and meat factory that his father ran. With a relatively adventur ous life, Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye is rated as one of the most influential American book of the 20th Century. One of the most private authors of the last century, “Sonny” as he was popularly called managed to give a clear picture of what adolescent is all about.   The Catcher in the Rye figures in the Top...
Post by: Sudipto Ghosh


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