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Coming Home to Dehra with Ruskin Bonds stories

Post by: Sudipto Ghosh

 

 Ruskin Bond is one name that is a common thread linking the childhood of all emphatic English book readers. One snap at his name and the dazzling memories of the childhood come gushing down like a snow laden river.

 

Ruskin Bond is one name that is a common thread linking the childhood of all emphatic English book readers. One snap at his name and the dazzling memories of the childhood come gushing down like a snow laden river. Almost every one of us has grown up living with the protagonists etched in his narrations. An author whose own childhood was spent in loneliness and boredom, made the lives of many kids a “booking” experience in itself, ready for publication to create a magic in its own right. Bond’s stories and compositions have continued to be the most unvarying cohorts for many kids and adults. His style of writing is akin to a prayer made to God: soulful and invigoratingly enlightening.

 

Ruskin Bond derives his inspiration from the Doon Valley. His childhood bears the fragrance of the Garden of the Himalaya, where he etched many friendships and earned affection. His affair with India was audaciously interrupted as he turned 16. The more time he spent away from the Doon Valley, the more he got deeper in his pursuit to write books. His love for India and her folklore grew stronger and that became his testing laboratory in writing original screenplays and short stories.


Son of a Royal Air Force fighter Pilot, Ruskin carries a flinching yet strong sense of Indian diaspora in his writing. The ‘Room on The Roof’ carries enthralling sequence of events on what it feels to be when you fritter your adolescence in the free gardens lining the foothills of the Himalaya. Don’t disregard the fact that this book was published when he was barely 21 and still exploring the novice world of essay writing, poems and folklore collection. His experiments took him to a flight of spirituality. As an exposition of the true art of writing, his script is inspired  by one solitary, yet significant line.


“Child is the Father of Man”.

William Wordsworth would have a living competition in Ruskin Bond for sure. His books contain instances of love, passion, innocent trust and serene landscape spun into a world of hope and faith. Every story has a promising message that shoots into the sky a galaxy of stars. Most of his writing work has been adapted into films, but none managed to pull the cord among the viewers like the pages from his journal did.


As many as 30 children's books flourished from his writing journal. Ruskin Bond is, undoubtedly, the epitome of classic literature, nurturing the impressionable prowess of kids. Many generations of kids and youth continue to bask in the sunshine that Ruskin Bond gave to the English literature, and to humanity.

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