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Thoughts that linger
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  A tall lanky man of unconventional looks takes over the tag of popular Hindi cinema’s leading man from a handsome, soft-spoken lover. It was a transition that no one could have foretold – also signaling the end of a fairy tale and the coming of angst on the silver screen.   Rajesh Khanna stormed into the hearts of cinema lovers with Shakti Samanta’s Aradhana (1969). If you are a Khanna fan, get hold the Yash Chopra directed Ittefaq (196...
Post by: Snehith Kumbla
  Three actors distinctly stand out in popular Hindi film history and they go by the following names – Pran, Mehmood and Helen. For over two decades, these three gifted actors were part of many Hindi films, yet they were never tiresome, never repetitive and always magical. Pran started his career as a hero, then after unexpected success started playing negative roles to great effect. His most famous films include Jis Desh Men Ganga Behti Hai (1960), Kashmir...
Post by: Snehith Kumbla
  Bob Dylan has been alive for more than seven decades now and he still keeps making songs and holding his concerts, but the enigma of the man fails to die down. As a film, I Am Not There (2007), based on him states in a gruffly monologue – “Even the ghost is more than one person.” What hits you with dinner gong effect, always, are the Bob Dylan lyrics. The words are all poetry, symbolic, haunting, effortlessly in meter and all contemporary. ...
Post by: Snehith Kumbla
  Before I read the Feluda series by Satyajit Ray, I did not understood his contribution to and his world of fine arts and literature. Feluda was one of the earliest reads of my life that developed my interest in reading. To cut a lengthy story short, Feluda or Pradosh C Mitter was a fictitious private detective created by Satyajit Ray. He appeared in some short stories which were first published in the Bengali magazine, Sandesh and later these were adapted to ...
Post by: Kabita Sonowal
  James Marsh Hendrix or simply call him “Jimi Hendrix”.   This guitar God who revolutionized the art of guitar playing forever is widely known as the most influential ‘electric  guitarist’ in the history of rock music. Born on the 27th of November 1942 in Seattle, America, Hendrix’s tryst with the guitar started at a very young age. Largely self taught and uniquely left handed, he began his musical journey playing for se...
Post by: Shardul Akolkar
"All the world's a stage, and all the men and women merely players.” - William Shakespeare   Writers write, they live, they die, and what remains is the oeuvre. There is one striking writer whose work has sparkled for centuries now, stranger to the rust of time and the march of human civilization. Quite simply, there has been no playwright who has captured the imagination of the reading and theatre audience like Shakespeare.   It is widely agre...
Post by: Snehith Kumbla
  Pardon the cliché, but why, would those unaware ask – so much song and dance about a certain music band called The Beatles? If you are a music lover, you would certainly understand why we remember The Beatles with much gratitude and pleasure. Now, I can’t speak for all, for it would be better to chronicle in brief here the effect the band has had on me.   For starters, The Beatles were a British band who ‘came together’ i...
Post by: Snehith Kumbla
With the passing away of Chinua Achebe on 21st March 2013 at the age of 82, Africa lost it’s most popular and distinctive voice in English literature. Born in Nigeria, Achebe lived for some time in the US in the 1970’s. He returned to the US following a 1990 accident that left him partially disabled. In 1967, Achebe was part of a struggle for a new nation – Biafra, but after a bloody struggle, the region became a part of Nigeria again. Until his death...
Post by: Snehith Kumbla
  BookChums is celebrating the lost art of letter writing all this week. As you can see, we are commemorating it with a display of a blank page of parchment and a black feather quill beside the BookChums logo. How do you revive a lost art whose time is up? In the age of technology and instant messaging, where messages can be sent anywhere and everywhere on the planet at the press of a button, the right question would be - Is there a need to resurrect letter writing...
Post by: Snehith Kumbla
  Few writers write with such an easy assurance as Anita Desai. Her prose exudes eloquence and charm, both rare qualities. Desai won the 1978 Sahitya Akademi Award for her novel Fire in the Mountain and the British Guardian Prize for The Village by the Sea. She has received three Booker Prize nominations so far, but it yet to win one. Ironically, her daughter Kiran Desai’s 2006 Man Booker Prize winning novel – The Inheritance of Loss had characters an...
Post by: Snehith Kumbla
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